Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: 0900 on February 28 (2020)

covid 19We want to make sure our members and friends are safe during this period and hope that everyone will cooperate in containing this virus.

We also know that everyone must eat and support their families, so your most burning questions are about wages.

At 0900, a General Union official visited the Osaka Labour Bureau to confirm the pay situation during this period.

At the moment, there is NO direct order for any board of education, private company, universities, or other schools, to close due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Therefore all closings are currently based on the employer's own decision.

Read more...

GU Organizes at Nagoya International School

nagoya gu sexual harassmentOn January 16th (2020), the General Union filed a case against Nagoya International School at the Osaka Prefectural Labour Commission.

Staff have raised a number of issues that they have with the school in conversations with the union, including difference in conditions between "local" and "foreign" hires being enrolled in social insurance (Shakai Hoken), maternity leave, annual leave, issues with evaluation and promotion, and issues with the way management have dealt with teachers.

However, the trigger that initially sparked interest in unionization was the way that management mis-handled a sexual harassment complaint.

Read more...

General Union Puts NOVA On Notice

Will the Neyagawa City Board of Education be hit by the first ever strike of dispatch ALTs in western Japan?

Could you live on 93,000 a month? Well, by some magical formula and/or equation that is known to only NOVA, ALTs hibernate in August.

ALTs (they apparently believe) also eat less than usual in December, January, and March, but a bit more than they do August, as they're only in a state of semi-hibernation during these months.

We all know NOVA's rationale, and some at this point might even believe it's fair to pay less because the teachers are working less during these months.

However, are these ALTs really "part-timers"?

Read more...

5% Wage Demand at Osaka Gaigo

Union members who were involved in a long labour dispute with their employer from 2013 which culminated in the Supreme Court turning down the school's refusal to follow the Osaka Labour Commission ruling ordering the employer to share financial data with the union, have submitted demands for 5% pay increase as well as access to financial data.

While members secured a 2% increase in 2019, we feel that asking for an additional pay increase after the school's stalling tactics of filing appeal after appeal since 2013, is very reasonable. Members note another increase in student numbers (still to be clearly established as it's only February) which points to the employer's improved financial situation and ability to increase pay.

Read more...

Making Berlitz Better

Union members at Berlitz became the second union branch to submit demands for a 2% increase in pay (over and above their regular evaluated pay increases) to offset the increases in the consumption tax since 2014.

Members believe that while pay has increased a little based on their individual evaluations, the importance of this pay raise, meant to reward performance only, is lost if is eroded by tax increases. Therefore, members are asking for a pay increase to rebalance their salaries from when the sales tax rate doubled from 5% to 10%.

Read more...

Labor Update Bulletin #80 (02/2020)

labor bulletin 2018This bulletin contains information on law changes, government discussions, court decisions, and other labor issues in Japan.

We hope that some of this information will also be of interest to activists, supporters of the General Union, and those who want to know more about labor issues in general in Japan.

Read more...

Labor Update Bulletin #79 (01/2020)

labor bulletin 2018This bulletin contains information on law changes, government discussions, court decisions, and other labor issues in Japan.

We hope that some of this information will also be of interest to activists, supporters of the General Union, and those who want to know more about labor issues in general in Japan.

Read more...

How To (Legally) Engage In Additional Work In Japan (FAQ)

If you live and work in Japan, you might find that your salary isn't always enough to make ends meet. Sure, you might be keeping the lights on every month, but perhaps there isn't much left over to save for a rainy day.

In these situations, a second (or third) job might seem to be the ideal solution: you have time; you need money; why not get do more work?

How do you engage in additional employment without running into trouble with the immigration office or your main place of work (and affecting your renewal chances)?

Read more...

Abe Government Attempts to Smash Labor Union in Kansai

From the Shingetsu News Agency (27 January, 2020)

In December, Yoichi Take of Kan'nama Union, and General Union officers and an interpreter met the Shingetsu News Agency for an interview.  

SNA (Tokyo) — Largely ignored by the mainstream media, the Abe government has been engaged for several years in one of the most aggressive and unconstitutional efforts to smash a small industrial labor union in Japan’s Kansai region, including mass arrests of union members.

The full name of the union in question is the Kansai District Ready-Mixed Concrete Branch of the All Japan Construction and Transport Workers Solidarity Union, but it sometimes goes by the shorter name "Kannama" for simplicity’s sake.

KEEP READING at the Shingetsu News Agency

Abe Government Attempts to Smash Labor Union in Kansai

From the Shingetsu News Agency - 27 January 2020

In December, Yoichi Take of Kan'nama Union, and General Union officers and an interpreter met the Shingetsu News Agency for an interview.  

------------------------------------

SNA (Tokyo) — Largely ignored by the mainstream media, the Abe government has been engaged for several years in one of the most aggressive and unconstitutional efforts to smash a small industrial labor union in Japan’s Kansai region, including mass arrests of union members.

The full name of the union in question is the Kansai District Ready-Mixed Concrete Branch of the All Japan Construction and Transport Workers Solidarity Union, but it sometimes goes by the shorter name “Kannama” for simplicity’s sake.

Kannama is among the minority of Japanese unions that is an industrial union, not the in-house union of a single company, and its members consist of workers inside ready-mixed concrete plants and the drivers of the concrete trucks who transport the wet concrete to construction sites throughout the Kansai region.

KEEP READING at the Shingetsu News Agency

 

Additional information